Social Media-It’s Impact on Mental Health by Aliya Shetty Oza


Aliya , one of the cofounders has been published online in the National High School Journal of Science. The National High School Journal of Science is a free, online, student-run and peer-reviewed research journal that is targeted towards high school students. Though run by students, they maintain high standards for publication thanks to the work of their dedicated peer reviewers and experienced Scientist Advisory Board, consisting of professional researchers.

You can find a link to it here.
https://nhsjs.com/2024/social-media-its-impact-on-mental-health/

This quantitative study investigates the impact of passive social media engagement on the mental health of young adults in the United States. The research uses a secondary analysis of a dataset collected in 2023 to assess the relationship between passive social media engagement and mental health. The study focuses on the relationship between passive social media activity and psychological distress, specifically stress, anxiety, and depression among young adults.

A pre-study was conducted using Gerson et al.’s (2017) Passive Active Use Measure (PAUM) to assess the shared variance among 12 self-reported social media behavior items. The main study used the Psychosocial Media Use (PSMU) items to investigate the relationship between social media use style, emotion recognition, and mental health.

The findings provide scientifically grounded insights into the intricate relationship between passive social media activity and psychological distress, particularly in the context of stress, anxiety, and depression among young adults. While the results do not offer a definitive, one-size-fits-all answer, they greatly enhance our understanding of the subject matter. The observed variability in findings underscores the need for an additional nuanced way to study social media’s impact on mental well-being. Future research should delve deeper into this domain, considering both passive and active social media engagement, to uncover the multifaceted dynamics at play and inform targeted interventions and policies.

This research holds significance for engineers and scientists working towards mitigating the impact of frequent passive social media engagement on the mental health of young adults in the U.S., specifically targeting stress, anxiety, and depression levels, as of 2023. The study emphasizes the importance of distinguishing between passive and active social media engagement for a comprehensive understanding.
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